Bridesmaid Sayings

Bridesmaid Sayings. Bridesmaid Dress Colour. Yellow Bridesmaids.

Bridesmaid Sayings

bridesmaid sayings

    bridesmaid

  • The Bridesmaid is a novel by British writer Ruth Rendell, first published in 1989. It is generally considered a fan-favourite, and was adapted into an acclaimed 2004 film by Claude Chabrol (who had previous adapted Rendell's earlier novel A Judgement in Stone, with great success).
  • A girl or woman who accompanies a bride on her wedding day
  • an unmarried woman who attends the bride at a wedding
  • Wedding ceremony participants, also referred to as the wedding party are the people that participate directly in the wedding ceremony itself.

    sayings

  • A short, pithy expression that generally contains advice or wisdom
  • ancient teachings or sayings
  • A collection of such expressions identified with a particular person, esp. a political or religious leader
  • A saying is something that is said, notable in one respect or another, to be "a pithy expression of wisdom or truth."

bridesmaid sayings – Be Your

Be Your Own Kind Of Beautiful 5.5h x 20w vinyl lettering for walls quotes art
Be Your Own Kind Of Beautiful 5.5h x 20w vinyl lettering for walls quotes art
**Please Note*** This is an original from WALL SAYINGS VINYL LETTERING. If you are not purchasing from WALL SAYINGS VINYL LETTERING then you are purchasing a knock off and we cannot guarantee the quality or accuracy of the product. Be your own kind of Beautiful. This vinyl lettering comes in Matte Black vinyl and measures approx. 5.5″ tall and 20″ wide. This wall saying comes pre-spaced on application tape with instructions to make installation quick and easy. Wall lettering is a quick way to upgrade any room in your home or office.

Sayings of Jesus on the cross

Sayings of Jesus on the cross
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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There are seven expressions traditionally attributed to Jesus during his crucifixion, gathered from the four Canonical Gospels.[1][2] Three of the sayings appear exclusively in the Gospel of Luke and three appear exclusively in the Gospel of John. The other saying appears both in the Gospel of Mark and the Gospel of Matthew.[3] In Mark and Matthew, Jesus cries out to God. In Luke, he forgives his killers, reassures the good thief, and commends his spirit to the Father. In John, he speaks to his mother, says he thirsts, and declares the end of his earthly life.

Since the 16th century these sayings have been widely used in the preachings on Good Friday and entire books have been written on the theological analysis, and the devotional elements of the seven sayings.[3][4][5][6]

Physicians and scientists who have studied the medical aspects of the crucifixion concluded that the sayings had to be short because crucifixion causes asphyxia. This makes inhaling air to speak difficult and painful, especially as death approaches.[7][8][9][10]

The seven sayings tradition is an example of the Christian approach to the construction of a Gospel harmony, in which material from different Gospels is combined, producing an account that goes beyond each Gospel.[11][3] James Dunn considers the sayings as are part of the elaborations in the diverse retellings of Jesus’ final hours.[12]

The seven sayings form part of a Christian meditation that is often used during Lent, Holy Week and Good Friday. The traditional order of the sayings is:[13]

1. Father forgive them, for they know not what they do (Luke 23:34).
2. Truly, I say to you, today you will be with me in paradise (Luke 23:43).
3. Woman, behold your son: behold your mother (John 19:26-27).
4. My God, My God, why have you forsaken me, (Matthew 27:46 and Mark 15:34).
5. I thirst (John 19:28).
6. It is finished (John 19:30).
7. Father, into your hands I commit my spirit (Luke 23:46).

Traditionally, these seven sayings are called words of 1. Forgiveness, 2. Salvation, 3. Relationship, 4. Abandonment, 5. Distress, 6. Triumph and 7. Reunion.[14]

As can be seen from the above list, not all seven sayings can be found in any one account of Jesus’ crucifixion. The ordering is a harmonisation of the texts from each of the four canonical gospels. In the gospels of Matthew and Mark, Jesus is quoted in Aramaic, shouting the fourth phrase only, and cries out wordlessly before dying. In Luke’s Gospel, the first, second, and seventh sayings occur. The third, fifth and sixth sayings can only be found in John’s Gospel. In other words:

* In Matthew and Mark :
o My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?
* In Luke:
o Father forgive them, for they know not what they do
o Truly, I say to you, today you will be with me in paradise (in response to one of the two thieves crucified next to him)
o Father, into your hands I commit my spirit (last words)
* In John:
o Woman, behold your son: behold your mother (directed at Mary, the mother of Jesus, either as a self reference, or as a reference to the beloved disciple and an instruction to the disciple himself)
o I thirst (just before a wetted sponge, mentioned by all the Canonical Gospels, is offered)
o It is finished (last words)

[edit] Father forgive them, for they know not what they do

Luke 23:34

Then Jesus said, "Father forgive them, for they know not what they do".

This first saying of Jesus on the cross is traditionally called "The Word of Forgiveness".[14] It is theologically interpreted as Jesus’ prayer for forgiveness for those who were crucifying him: the Roman soldiers, and apparently for all others who were involved in his crucifixion.[15][16][17][18] However, many early manuscripts omit Luke 23:34.[19]
[edit] Today you will be with me in paradise

Luke 23:43

And he said to him, "Truly, I say to you, today you will be with me in paradise".

This saying is traditionally called "The Word of Salvation".[14] According to Luke’s Gospel, Jesus was crucified between two thieves, one of whom supports Jesus’ innocence and asks him to remember him when he comes into his kingdom. Jesus replies, "Truly, I say to you…" (???? ???? ???, amen lego soi), followed with the only appearance of the word "paradise" in the Gospels (?????????, paradeiso, from the Persian pairidaeza "paradise garden").
[edit] Behold your son: behold your mother

John 19:26-27

Jesus saw his own mother, and the disciple standing near whom he loved, he said to his mother, "Woman, behold your son". Then he said to the disciple, "Behold your mother". And from that hour, he took his mother into his family.

This statement is traditionally called "The Word of Relationship" and in it Jesus en

Wise old sayings.

Wise old sayings.
Sayings:

‘Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.’

‘We should feel sorrow but not sink under its oppression.’

‘To be wronged is nothing unless you continue to remember.’

‘To see and listen to the wicked is already the beginning of wickedness.’

It’d be nice if you could pick your favourite saying, or even comment with ones of your own :)

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